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There’s a lot of confusion about radiofrequencies, wireless devices and health.

Here are the facts.

What is the scientific evidence related to RF and health?

The evidence consists of thousands of peer-reviewed studies conducted over 70 years by independent scientific organizations. The  Federal Communications Commission, said “There is no scientific evidence to date that proves that wireless phone usage can lead to cancer or a variety of other health effects…”

What do the experts say?

The international scientific consensus is that there are no known health risks from RF energy at the low levels approved for everyday consumer use. This includes the expert opinion of the World Health Organization, the American Cancer Society and the Food and Drug Administration. “There is no convincing scientific evidence that the weak RF signals from base stations [cell towers] and wireless networks cause adverse health effects,” (World Health Organization).

Are cellphones, cell towers, small cells and antennas safe?

Radiofrequency energy from wireless devices and networks, including radiofrequencies used by 5G, has not been shown to cause health problems, according to the international scientific community. To cite one example, the Food and Drug Administration said, “Based on our ongoing evaluation of this issue, the totality of the available scientific evidence continues to not support adverse health effects in humans caused by exposures at or under the current radiofrequency energy exposure limits.”

Is 5G safe?

The scientific consensus is that there are no known health risks from all forms of RF energy at the low levels approved for everyday consumer use. The FCC regulates RF emissions, including millimeter waves from 5G devices and equipment, and has adopted the recommendations of expert scientific organizations that have reviewed the science, including dozens of studies focused specifically on millimeter waves, and established safe exposure levels. Typical exposure to 5G devices—such as small cells attached to phone poles or the sides of buildings—is far below the permissible levels and comparable to Bluetooth devices and baby monitors (New Orleans City Council Hearing, 2019.) The FCC continues to monitor the science to ensure that its regulations are protective of public health.

Why are people spreading misinformation about 5G online?

A recent New York Times investigation reveals that the Russian government is “doing its best to stoke the fears of American viewers,” by spreading false information about 5G and health, including “claims that lack scientific support.” As the article makes clear, “plenty of careful science has scrutinized wireless technology for potential health risks. Virtually all the data contradict the dire alarms.” Russia’s efforts appear to be a form of ‘economic warfare’ that draw on discredited research, according to the experts cited by the New York Times.

“… although many studies have examined the potential health effects of non-ionizing radiation from radar, microwave ovens, cell phones, and other sources, there is currently no consistent evidence that non-ionizing radiation increases cancer risk in humans.”

“Based on our ongoing evaluation of this issue, the totality of the available scientific evidence continues to not support adverse health effects in humans caused by exposures at or under the current radiofrequency energy exposure limits.”

“Recent surveys have indicated that RF exposures from base stations and wireless technologies in publicly accessible areas (including schools and hospitals) are normally thousands of times below international standards . . . From all evidence accumulated so far, no adverse short- or long-term health effects have been shown to occur from the RF signals produced by base stations.”

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